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Title: Accounting for the Rise of Health Spending and Longevity
Authors: Fonseca, Raquel
Michaud, Pierre-Carl
Kapteyn, Arie
Galama, Titus
Keywords: Demand for health
Life cycle
Health spending
Technology
Insurance
Longevity
Issue Date: 2013-09
Series/Report no.: Cahiers du CIRPÉE;13-26
Abstract: We estimate a stochastic life-cycle model of endogenous health spending, asset accumulation and retirement to investigate the causes behind the increase in health spending and longevity in the U.S. over the period 1965-2005. We estimate that technological change and the increase in the generosity of health insurance on their own may explain 36% of the rise in health spending (technology 30% and insurance 6%), while income explains only 4% and other health trends 0.5%. By simultaneously occurring over this period, these changes may have led to complementarity effects which we find to explain an additional 57% increase in health spending. The estimates suggest that the elasticity of health spending with respect to changes in both income and insurance is larger with co-occurring improvements in technology. Technological change, taking the form of increased health care productivity at an annual rate of 1.3%, explains almost all of the rise in life expectancy at age 25 over this period while changes in insurance and income together explain less than 10%. Welfare gains are substantial and most of the gain appears to be due to technological change.
URI: https://depot.erudit.org/id/003829dd
Appears in Collections:Cahiers de recherche du CIRPÉE

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